Potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment. Death of a Gummy Bear 2019-01-10

Potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment Rating: 6,3/10 1403 reviews

Gummy Bear Sacrifice

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

At a , the potas­si­um ion re­ceives a large quan­ti­ty of en­er­gy and moves to an un­sta­ble state. Clifton's going to play a little rondo or music while I set this reaction up. Wear pro­tec­tive gloves, glass­es and a mask. The hygroscopic and slightly weaker sodium chlorate is sometimes used as a safer and less expensive substitute for potassium chlorate. Clean up is not the easiest because there are charred bits stuck to the test tube. When I took the beaker out, there was a nice layer of white, plate-like crystals covering the bottom.

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Where to find potassium chlorate

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

At room temperature and pressure, the salt exists as a solid. The potassium chlorate is extremely hot and will cause burns to the skin so keep all body parts away from the testing area once the bear has been placed and until the explosion has ended. Neither matter nor energy is created or destroyed in a chemical reaction only changed. Chemical Demonstrations: A Handbook for Teachers of Chemistry; Wisconsin; 1983; Volume 1; p. This is due to trouble categorizing a post which often has multiple gifs that don't fall under one category and leads to a misleading post and confusion. They tend to smell little or not at all.

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Where to find potassium chlorate

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

We must add 1 calorie of heat to increase the temperature of 1g of water 1 degree Celsius. The heat, evolved or required is the change in enthalpy. For this experiment students will need a test tube with holder, a gummy bear, latex gloves, tongs, 10 grams of potassium chlorate and a torch. Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again. The reaction produces a sweet burnt smell. We can also use it to fuel a chemical reaction.

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How to Oxidize gummy bears with molten potassium chlorate ¬ę Science Experiments :: WonderHowTo

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

Potassium Chlorate is the oxidizing agent and when it is melted; its decomposition provides an oxygen rich environment. Heat is necessary in this reaction because the excess of oxygen, generated by the decomposition of potassium chlorate, will react with the glucose in a gummy bear, releasing a large amount of energy quickly and dramatically. They are small, colorful and kid-friendly. The mixture crackles and quickly bursts into beautiful lilac flames, making a lot of smoke as well. Because potassium chlorate reacts to sulfuric acid.

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Potassium Chlorate & Gummy Bears by Chris Ian on Prezi

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

Add a small bit of a gummy bear to the test tube and observe the reaction. This oxidation is incredibly exothermic -5000 kJmol-1. Add a gum­my bear to the liq­uid. This video tutorial will show you how to oxidize gummy bears with molten potassium chlorate. It could turn into high explosive.

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Potassium Chlorate + Gummy Bear = An Awesome Explosion

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

The gummy bears are not as dangerous and not that many at any given time. Place a small quantity of potassium chlorate in a test tube. These crystals looked much different too - they were much more compact, and some were needle-like rather than the nice plates from the first batch. ? When it comes in contact with the oxygen in the test tube some of the sucrose disintegrates and this releases heat energy. The energy evolved as heat is calculated below: 2.

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Potassium Chlorate & Gummy Bears by Chris Ian on Prezi

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

For example a post featuring a can being smashed or the motion of a pendulum will be removed. Chlorine gas will be produced in the flask and will react with the hot alkaline solution to make Chlorate and chloride anion. Potassium chlorate also has other uses as well. Aside from that, it is the most common chlorate to be used industrially. The experiment is used to determine the amounts of combinations possible to result in given colors: green, red, yellow and orange.

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How to Perform the Dancing Gummi Bear Demonstration

potassium chlorate and gummy bear experiment

Now the amount of energy released from this explosion is exactly the same as the amount of energy that would be released in my body when I eat this gummy bear. Potassium Chlorate is a chemical made up of three other respective elements- Potassium, Chlorine, and Oxygen. The large-scale production of this compound made the first quality colored fireworks possible, about a century ago. This reaction is probably familiar to you. Thus, it may be simply placed in a test tube and heated over a burner. Part of the reason for its popularity in commercial pyrotechnics is that it is cheap and easily available.

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